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Forestry

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DID YOU KNOW?

Louisiana’s forestlands cover 48% of the state’s area – 13.8 million acres.

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DID YOU KNOW?

Louisiana's Forestry industry contributes $2.9 billion to the states economy

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DID YOU KNOW?

LDAF wildland firefighters protect 18.9 million acres of Louisiana forests.

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DID YOU KNOW?

Of the 148,000 owners of Louisiana forestland, 81% are private non-industrial landowners.

The primary responsibilities of the office are to: suppress timberland wildfires; promote sound forest management practices; disseminate information; facilitate educational programs; produce reforestation seedlings; enforce timber-related laws; investigate timber theft; and assist community urban forestry programs. The Office of Forestry also operates and maintains the Alexander State Forest located in central Louisiana, seven miles south of Alexandria.

Louisiana’s forestlands cover 48% of the state’s area or 13.8 million acres. Private, non-industrial landowners own 62 percent of the state’s forestland, forest products industries own 29 percent and the general public owns 9 percent. This renewable resource provides the raw material for Louisiana’s second largest manufacturing employer – the forest products industry – with over 900 firms in 45 parishes directly employing over 25,000 people. An additional 8,000 people are employed in the harvesting and transportation of the resource. Louisiana’s forests provide a multitude of other benefits, including clean air and water, wildlife habitat, recreational opportunities and scenic beauty

With adequate protection, followed by appropriate and accepted forest management techniques, Louisiana’s forests are available to serve our state, both rural and urban, not only on a sustained basis, but at an increased level of productivity. Recognizing the various interests and needs of so many owners, efforts to encourage and promote sound forestry practices on such a vast area requires a balanced, educational process.